Friday, September 30, 2011

Lyndora Bakery ~

Still in operation.
Photo: Barbara Bloom

24 comments:

Anonymous said...

How wonderfull it was,coming home from school to find Mom making homemade soup. I knew that Dad would be stopping off to get some great Lyndora bread.

Anonymous said...

I remember when Nick Kascheck (sic) owned Lyndora bread. He lived on Milheim Drive in Center Township and competed with Delotto Italian bread, also made in Butler. Delotto was often sold out by noon at various retail outlets; Lyndora baked more bread and was available all day, generally, until they baked the next day.

jerry.friedman said...

There used to be no greater treat on a Sunday morning than to buy a fresh loaf of bread and jelly donuts from the Lyndora Bakery. The aroma of fresh bread baking in the oven was amazing. Long before the many varieties of donuts offered by Dunkin Donuts and other chains, a jelly filled treat from the Lyndora Bakery was as exotic as you could find in Butler. For me, it was a special trip because before the building was a bakery, it was a hardware and grocery store started by my grandfather, Jacob Friedman, who was the founder of Friedman's Markets. My father's early childhood was spent living above the store. I stopped during my last visit to Butler and had a lovely chat with the current owners and, of course, treated myself to a jelly donut. It was just as good as I remembered. This is a special Butler treasure that should be supported.

I was born in a small town said...

Finally - a blog on the Lyndora Bakery; I am 55 years young, living outside of Washington D.C., and one of my favorite memories was going with my parents into the Lyndora Bakery after serving 8:00 a.m. Sunday Mass at Saint Stanislaus, and picking up our weekly purchase of a loaf of dark rye (still haven't found any better yet), light rye, and a dozen croisants (we called them kiffles, right or wrong).
These small-town delights are being forced out by the Super-Walmarts of the world - so if you enjoy it - support it - and don't be concerned about paying a few cents more for baked goods (and that goes for all things local) in order to keep these businesses. afloat.
Think long-term if you want to keep local institutions and services alive;I have seen far toom any go the way of the dinosaur in my travels.

I was born in a small town said...

(Spelling corrections to earlier post)
Finally - a blog on the Lyndora Bakery; I am 55 years young, living outside of Washington D.C., and one of my favorite memories was going with my parents into the Lyndora Bakery after serving 8:00 a.m. Sunday Mass at Saint Stanislaus, and picking up our weekly purchase of a loaf of dark rye (still haven't found any better yet), light rye, and a dozen croissants (we called them kiffles, right or wrong).
These small-town delights are being forced out by the Super Walmarts of the world - so if you enjoy a local institution, what ever local service it is - support it - and don't be concerned about paying a few cents more(and that goes for all things local) in order to keep these businesses afloat.
Think long-term if you want to keep local institutions and services alive; I have seen far to many go the way of the dinosaur in my travels.

Anonymous said...

Why does everyone blame Walmart? Remember that 7-11 was around before Walmart - they drove away the mom and pop corner stores. Walmart is not to blame for everything that goes worn

Anonymous said...

Mmmmmmmmmm, maple rolls too! Yessir!

Used to daydream in that small town said...

To Walmart Defender:
That's the spirit - Stop shopping at Walmart and 7-11; Join the retaking of America and give what is left back to our children, nieces and nephews, and grandchildren.
Support your local farmer, buy fresh and healthy local fruits and vegetables (anyone heard of listeria), your local bakeries, your local butchers. Folks in Butler (and other small towns in the Northeast, and elsewhere) are fortunate to have these institutions right in their community.
Support them or they won't be around tomorrow.
I really doubt anyone would shed a tear of nostaglia if we all learned tomorrow that Wal-Mart was ceasing operations at all stores.

Anonymous said...

Walmart can be defeated with personalized service. Small town family owned businesses can always beat Walmart with service. I know because I have one of those businesses.
Walmart is a price driven mass merchandiser. They are good at a lot of things but not great at anything.

Anonymous said...

This bakery used to be fantastic, but since it reopened (after being shut down for quite some time) it's just not the same. We went inside and there was no bakery aroma that makes you want to buy. Also, it was so dark and dismal so there was nothing visually enticing either. Hope the owners can soon make it like it was - - fantastic.

Anonymous said...

As far as Walmart goes, it's the latest generation of mass merchandisers starting with Sears Roebuck and Monkey Wards in the 50's, K Mart in the 70's and now Walmart. I remember how my Dad used to drive to New Castle to shop at the Sears store because Butler only had a catalogue outlet. Troutman's tended to be higher priced and the Monkey Wards was pretty crappy and always out of stock.

R. Wertz said...

Speaking of Monkey Wards, does anyone remember back in the last century when the CEO of M-W was arrested?

http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=show_mesg&forum=389&topic_id=9551335&mesg_id=9551335

Anonymous said...

I love the Lyndora Bakery. I still go there.Growing up..on Sunday mornings, after church, my job was to walk to the corner to get the Sunday paper and then over to the bakery to get bread, donuts, kiffles. I will grant you the items today aren't quite the same. The different oven is noticible. But I'm so glad it came back. i hope it continues for a long time!!!!

Becky Belfer Orum said...

Kiffles, oh how well I remember. Every Sunday morning, we would load up in the car with Mom and go pick up our favorite baked goods. What memories.

Anonymous said...

Lyndora Bakery Kiffles Rule !!!!;)

Anonymous said...

Back in the late 50's, 60's and 70's there was kind of an Italian bread war in Butler. On one side, Deloto's, in a white paper sack with red lettering and (I think) a drawing of a baker. And in this corner, on the other side, Lyndora bread--white paper sack and blue lettering; no picture. We were a Deloto family until later, when it became (because of it's popularity) increasingly difficult to get Deloto before it sold out; generally around noon everyday. Then we switched to Lyndora bread.

When I got my tonsils out around 1960, the first thing I had to eat when I came home from the hospital was a hunk of Saxonburg baloney and a thick slice of Deloto bread (honest).

Lyndora bread was good, but I always thought Deloto was better. Course, as I said, we were a Deloto family.

Were all memories of childhood so pleasant.....

Beverly said...

Tell you what I do remember.......jelly filled donuts. Ymmy and they were good!!! Yes, the memories still stand and the kiffles do too. Oh well..........life goes on and we must make room for the next ones. To bad we can't leave them a taste and smell of what we shared in the past. :)

Anonymous said...

I am not totally supporting Walmart but there are so many others to blame. Malls started it all. Giant Eagle has a bakery but nobody says anthing bad about them. I am just a fan of home made bread. The problem is that the kids of today do not want the responsibility of a family business because they can't live on the income they would have to. They all want $ 100,000 or better. How many small Jewelry Businesses have we lost because of the kids not wanting it. Toy stores. I blame everything on Laziness

Anonymous said...

I grew up in Lyndora with my next-door neighbor being one of the sisters that coowned the Lyndora National Bakery. Julie Olen (& husband John) along with sister Helen & husband George Bristen were the owner/operators up until Helen's son George took over the business. It was the neighborhood "hangout". John &a Julie's lights were never on late into the evening as they left in the wee hours of the mornings to bake the kiffles, maple rolls and fresh breads that we all loved and remember. Who also remembers that you could only get certain items on certain days? Many days I would go to pick something fresh for dinner and I would come home with a huge bag of goodies. John & Julie didn't remember children and treated my brother and I as if we were theirs. Although I cannot remember a nickname for me, my brother's nickname from George was Putty. I won't go into details, but this post brought back fond memories. I don't know if Georgie is still running the bakery, but I sure hope the kiffles are still being made....missing them from Ohio

adgorn said...

Grandma, aunts, uncles and cousins lived nearby. We used to come visit Lyndora from Chicago every year when I was a kid. The bakery had the best bread for toast!

Joe Lestyk said...

I still think that the dark rye from Lyndora bakery is the best bread I ever ate. I have never seen kiffles anywhere else in the world, either.

DewOnAPetal said...

We used to call the jelly filled donuts "sinkers". They were excellent!

Anonymous said...

Are they called Kiffles or Kipples

Anonymous said...

My grandmother(as a young girl) and her family(Semanco) lived on top of the bakery sometime in the 1920's or 30s. She was related to Kuschik and would tell me that they would never give her or her family free food(lol) and how it would be soooooo hot up there in the summer.