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Saturday, February 27, 2010

A True Butlerite of 78 Years ~

Gene Zarnick

has written



16 comments:

Anonymous said...

Everyone should write his or her life story. Gene set a good example by writing about the people who influenced his life as well as
the places and events of the times.
Good job.

Anonymous said...

Love Gene's memories with one exception. I have a lot of pictures to prove that Alameda Park was better maintained when the Nazerenes had it back in late 50's early 60's than it is now under Government control. The grass was always neatly trimmed and those little cottages were only used one week per year during camp meeting. Each was owned by an individual family.

Anonymous said...

Good read, Thanks

Anonymous said...

O Lord. . . this refreshes all my memories of bygone days. Thanks Gene.

Anonymous said...

Loved reading about days of yore in Butler. Having grown up in Butler, and only in my 40's, this was a great step back in time. I'm fond of the simpler times of our world. How did we go off track?

Anonymous said...

Was Morrison's Candy Company located in the old Benson's Store now Fudoli's Music

Anonymous said...

How amazing that Butler got rid of ALL these great things and now this town is boring. Way to go Butler!

Anonymous said...

Great read. Thanks Gene Zarnick!

Anonymous said...

This really set me back in the good old days when I was a boy in Butler. Thanks Gene!!

Anonymous said...

One fond memory I have of Butler in the 1950's was walking from the West End up New Castle Hill to the
original Butler Fairgrounds (where
the high school sits today) to the
stock car races in the summer time.
We'd stop for a pop at Doria's Market on Mercer Street on the way home.

Anonymous said...

You can get movies of Butler in the 1940's on DVD from the Lions Club.

Anonymous said...

why just the 40's ?????????? was there other life in other years in Butler??????

Anonymous said...

Most people with common sense would realize that to have a movie made about a city in the 1940s is somewhat uncommon

Anonymous said...

Companies to make money would come into a town a film scenes of the town usually with lots of people. They would return some months latter and then show the movie and charge admission. Before the days of home video cameras, this would have been a unique thrill for people to see themselves in the movies. They were not filming a documentary on the history of Butler. They had simply found a way to make a buck.

Anonymous said...

THANKS GENE, REMEMBERING GOING TO MORANDOS MARKET.

Anonymous said...

Hello Gene, What is your e-mail address? Some day I'd like to write to you and thank.