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Monday, July 25, 2011

Butler Armco ~

David E. Todd
Wrote this book to show his appreciation of the Armco. He published it himself and distributed it to older employees and retirees.
Available:

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

That red part of the building, to the right, looks like Slab Grinding; the smaller, silver section immediately to the left looks like the Slab Mill, where I worked briefly in the 1970's. Does anyone know, is this book self-published (by Dave Todd, former works manager) or available at retail?

Anonymous said...

I've answered my own question. The book is self-published and available here:

Caliban Books Pittsburgh PA, ABAA
via Alibis books

United States

It's priced, used, at $64; there are a couple of other outlets selling it as high as $95!! I won't be purchasing, needless to say.

Anonymous said...

Loved the tours of the buildings open to families every 10 years or special Armco anniversaries.

I worked at Equitable who handled the health insurance for Armco employees. With a lot of other industries, there were a ton of claims filed for children and women and then men as they got old. With steel mill employees, there were lots of heart conditions showing up in the mid-40's. Working there took a toll on the body.

willie d said...

Butler was the typical Pa. mill town when I grew up there in the 40's and 50's. I knew many people that worked at ARMCO (American Rolling Mills Corp.) and as far as I know it was a pretty nice place to work as far as labor-management relations. They had a company union and never went on strike like the USW plants. Had a really nice park up on the Slippery Rock for employees and friends. I do remember a cheap date was going up on the hill across Rt. 8 and watching them dump slag. Spectacular colors!

Pat G said...

Dave has self published 2 or maybe 3 books about ARMCO to date. There are a few posters out there too. The majority of these books were given to retirees and older employees free for the asking. A very generous gesture.

Anonymous said...

My dad died in 1980 of a heart attack. He worked @ ARMCO for about 25 years prior and had heart disease. Wasn't aware that the condition was common among ARMCO workers back then. I do remember the ARMCO pension benefits folks telling my mom that she would receive greatly reduced benefits because dad didn't quite make 25 years. Mom received next to nothing.

Gary Poole said...

I worked at ARMCO from 1965 till about 1970.I worked in the masonary dept and then transferred to the silicon dept.ARMCO was a good place to work and paid good wages and the company union did a good job for the employees.I do remember doing hot jobs and roofs with the brick layers, that was tough work and it didn't hurt me.

Anonymous said...

My father was a pipefitter at Armco and his father before him. My father didn't care for the union coming in---he felt the company was very fair and gave a good wage. He didn't think too much of the fellas pushing for the union. As a child, I remember going to the movie house for a Christmas show and being given a Christmas stocking filled with goodies. And the annual picnic was fun too.

Hope Schnell said...

Are these books available to purchase? My pap worked there back in the 1960's. His name is Jeffrey Troutman. I am the daughter of his oldest daughter Tracy. I have been searching for information about him. I would greatly appreciate anything anyone is willing to share. Thank you
Hope Schnell
Email schnell724@zoominternet.net